Author Topic: IDE.  (Read 12651 times)

Denis Ivliev

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IDE.
« on: December 24, 2009, 09:25:43 PM »
Hello!

Couldn't you advice me good IDE for nasm?

Offline Frank Kotler

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Re: IDE.
« Reply #1 on: December 26, 2009, 11:41:34 PM »
Hi Denis,

I prefer to work from the command line, so I don't have any experience with IDEs. Jeff's AsmIde seems "okay" to me, but I haven't used it much. There was an "ide-nasm" posted here some time ago - requires "GAMBAS", which I've never gotten installed, So I've never tried it. I can dig that up, if you want to have a shot at it.

In a supreme irony, I am chief maintainer of a non-existant assembly IDE called "Luxasm". I remarked to Betov, author of RosAsm (a Windows thing) that even though I didn't like an IDE, I thought it would be cool if someone ported RosAsm to Linux. He replied, "Okay, Frank, you're the chief maintainer of Luxasm!" While I had no intention of doing the port myself, I thought it was a really cool name, so I registered such a project here at SourceForge. A few potential developers gathered around, and we kicked some ideas around. One guy, who goes by "C", produced some code, and an interesting macro set (which I don't think anyone but him understands). He ran out of time (and/or perhaps became dissatisfied with my "administration" of the project). Another potential developer appears to have vanished from the net entirely. So the project may appear to be "abandoned", but it's actually "in a medically induced coma", awaiting developers. :)

So it isn't an entirely idle question to ask, "What are you looking for in an IDE?"

I feel no urgency to work on "Luxasm" - I figure Jeff's AsmIde covers the folks who want a Nasm/Linux IDE - but I'm open to discussion...

Best,
Frank

Offline dsdarrow

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Re: IDE.
« Reply #2 on: February 02, 2010, 03:03:19 AM »
Hi all;
I'm not realy new here...been lurking for a good while, though infrequently. I'm no programmer, more of a retired kindergartner.
Did a little asm programming on DOS (before Windows) and moved onto other fields of interest. Now? only looking into assembler for my own interest sake; and to kill time caused by early retirement due to economic woes.

But if you're looking for a lightweight semi-IDE for the Linux world, take a look at Gedit. It's part of the Gnome Desktop, but it runs on nearly everything now from Gnome to KDE to Windows (believe it or not) and they are getting a large amount of plugins contributed by the user community that have expanded it's usefulness mightily to far beyond just the text editor domain. So take a look. I've got nothing to gain. I mostly use SciTE for my own trivial pedkin' but I've been thinking of switching if I ever get to the stage that requires something more than just a nice text editor. Another suggestion is Codelite or even Codeblocks. All three are free and you can find them on SourceForge.

Offline Bryant Keller

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Re: IDE.
« Reply #3 on: February 02, 2010, 04:35:19 AM »
I'm not really familiar with the CodeLite User Templates feature but CodeLite fully supports NASM syntax highlighting and I was able to do a quick test-run using the "Custom Makefile" build. I was actually fairly impressed with it and didn't realise it had support for NASM until I read this thread and decided to see what all IDE's support NASM syntax. It's a really decent IDE and I kinda like it's workspace/project setup (seems suitable for fairly large projects). I personally just use pico and make as my preferred environment on Linux, but if I can take some time to figure out the User Templates system I might switch over to CodeLite myself. :)

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Offline KusaNoKaito

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Re: IDE.
« Reply #4 on: February 07, 2010, 11:01:54 PM »
I'm pretty sure "geany" works with NASM.
May the source be with you

David

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Re: IDE.
« Reply #5 on: February 07, 2010, 11:05:18 PM »
I like the simple Notepad++

Klod

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Re: IDE.
« Reply #6 on: February 14, 2010, 10:24:21 PM »
I have downloaded CodeLite and had a look. It does look good, could not figure out how to make Nasm syntax work. I visited the board no luck. Anybody got a go at it?
klod

Offline Bryant Keller

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Re: IDE.
« Reply #7 on: February 15, 2010, 01:25:35 AM »
CodeLite supported NASM syntax highlighting out of box for me (Linux) once I named the source files with the .asm extension. Using the "Custom Makefile" option I was able to build a project but when I selected to save that project as a template then tried to use that template to create a new project it didn't work. :(

I'm currently sitting in FreeNode's #codelite waiting on a response on the issue because I would really like to know myself how to create a user template for nasm projects as I think CodeLite would make a perfect IDE for NASM development if the issue could be squared away. If anyone figures this out before I do, please post back here. I would love be enlightened on this issue.

Regards,
Bryant Keller

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Offline Bryant Keller

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Re: IDE.
« Reply #8 on: February 15, 2010, 03:00:32 AM »
UPDATE:

Okay, with the help of eranif from FreeNode's #codelite I was able to get my User-Template fixed. My problem was that I didn't put a './' in front of main.asm so when I chose the 'new directory' option it would lose the source file. That's fixed now and it's working like a charm. :)

Attached to this post is the NASM User Template which can be uncompressed to:

~/.workspace/templates/projects

You should customise main.asm to your liking.
« Last Edit: February 15, 2010, 03:04:09 AM by Bryant Keller »

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Offline Dman95

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Re: IDE.
« Reply #9 on: March 04, 2014, 09:33:26 PM »
I suggest try SASM - simple cross-platform IDE for NASM, written by me. It supports syntax highlighting, debugger and many other features. SASM works out of the box and is well suited for beginners.
« Last Edit: March 04, 2014, 09:36:26 PM by Dman95 »

Offline Bryant Keller

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Re: IDE.
« Reply #10 on: March 04, 2014, 11:51:06 PM »
Neat project, though I can't really say it was worth reopening a 4 year old thread. You could create a new thread if you wished to discuss the merits of your IDE. Self promotion is perfectly fine here, as long as it's on the topic of NASM itself, your IDE fits within that context.  ;)

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Offline HD1920.1

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Re: IDE.
« Reply #11 on: April 21, 2014, 06:18:31 AM »
OK, it's not an IDE, but a good editor is Notepad2 (http://flos-freeware.ch/notepad2.html).

Offline dalfonso01

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Re: IDE.
« Reply #12 on: May 04, 2014, 07:01:36 AM »
Hi,
I was a little (perhaps not...) surprised to see that asm is the least supported language in plugins for vim or other "already there" editors. I found the SASM proposal quite good, as it removes the need to buy the elephant to use a plugin just for asm (talking in general), where existing.

I wrote this directly to Dman95, but I think could be interesting to expand here to share ideas an opinions. In assembler IDEs are not so used, but what is really  missing is some clever clever editor to support the write to build part of the flow.
This is the simple toolkit I use for daily C++
vi + .vim_runtime   https://github.com/amix/vimrc
astyle

It is not that much and simply supports some operations that make the daily life (before neatbeans or others) quite better.
--- write the code, with on inline formatting, as moving back and forth } as you pair something under indented statements or exit a block
--- snippets with snipmate, mainly, if not only, to add predefined types of formatted block of comments to give another better look to the whole stuff
--- make a consistent formatting up to the space with astyle to get a precise code style after a set and forget policies in a config.

In asm, while insight/gdb  is there , there is no (or probably is some elephant) focused ide or let's say editor++(+)  to cover at the best the write to build (included) gdb as part of the flow.
SASM could be a quite good candidate to cover this, as it is light, is focused on NASM, already has code highlighting, supports the build phase, gives access to gdb, that is full at power to direct use for direct queries.
Suppose to have an astyle similar button to format, an inline formatting of text, more than indentation, a multiple set of quick build commands (one for inserting -g -F and one for normal build, or make debug and simply make) as it is already, but with only one, and we could begin to have some quite quick predebug support get organized.

In summary, I would leave the gdb at the bottom, improving as much as one would, but in a "light operational" debug perspective (having all at finger does not necessarily increase the operational quality, that is why insight exists on top of the engine) , while would make what comes before the better possible experience, where there is lack in the field.

The basic layout of SASM is quite comfortable and if it offers agile support to this part of the job and links to the rest, there is no religious need to go on with gedit...

Thanks
Fabio D'Alfonso 

« Last Edit: May 04, 2014, 08:27:44 AM by dalfonso01 »

Offline dalfonso01

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Re: IDE.
« Reply #13 on: May 04, 2014, 10:14:46 AM »
Anyway, to go on with the subject, I do not think that given the variety of details that make the build process, there will be useful to have any kind of predefined idea of what to do.

Better is to hub the process to external tools, directly or indirectly.
this kind of config:
-g -f elf32 $SOURCE$ -l $LSTOUTPUT$ -o $PROGRAM.OBJ$
$PROGRAM.OBJ$ $MACRO.OBJ$ -g -o $PROGRAM$ -m32
(that comes still from SAMS but the discussion is in general)

do not seem to make sense, I would decide what to run and how to run. hub, hub, hub!

Fabio D'Alfonso


Offline mega

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Re: IDE.
« Reply #14 on: May 18, 2014, 02:14:03 PM »
I wouldn't normally contribute to a thread started in 2009 but seeing as there's already been activity this year ...

I put together a plugin last week to make vim into a basic nasm IDE .. I posted to the users mail list but it seems to be dead. In any case, if you're a vim user and you have some time to take a look any feedback would be appreciated

thanks

Ref: http://code.google.com/p/vimnasm/
« Last Edit: May 18, 2014, 02:15:55 PM by mega »